Getting to Paris target requires more rapid transition off fossil fuels

(OTTAWA) — A leaked summary of the upcoming Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report on the pathway to 1.5 degrees C provides clear warning that Trudeau's climate policy is wholly inadequate. In Paris in 2015, the IPCC was instructed to report in 2018 on what emission reduction trajectories would be required to meet the Paris target. It was clear in December 2015 that the totality of all governments' promises, if achieved, would blow past 1.5 to as much as 3.5 degrees C. This leak provides confirmation that the situation has worsened. 



"This summary makes clear that we are about to plumb the depths of the worst effects of climate change if we do not immediately adopt a fossil fuel phase-out policy, along with implementing atmospheric CO2-sucking technology, in order to have any hope of limiting global temperature increase to less than the 1.5C that our government has committed itself to," argued Richard Zurawski, meteorologist and Green Party of Canada Climate Change Critic. "The expression ‘you can’t suck and blow at the same time’ comes to mind when listening to our Prime Minister and his Minister of Environment and Climate Change blow hard about how vital Kinder Morgan is to Canada meeting its Paris climate change obligations." 



The leaked, peer-reviewed IPCC data scotches any notion that continued fossil fuels use, especially those from the CO2-intensive oilsands, is compatible with mitigating climate change. "The Liberal hot air would have you believe that you can have it both ways. The IPCC says it is not possible. In over two years since the Liberals assumed power, we have squandered precious time, while claiming new climate leadership. The IPCC says we have run out of time, and it has the data to back it up," added Elizabeth May, Leader of the Green Party of Canada. "The Liberal version of ‘environment and economy go hand in hand’ is like claiming that going on a diet and eating more chocolate cake go hand in hand. Environment and economy do go hand in hand, but only when the decisions support both; not when they are mutually inconsistent," concluded Ms. May. 


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For additional information or to arrange an interview, contact:



Debra Eindiguer

m: (613) 240-8921

debra.eindiguer@greenparty.ca