Clear and Consistent use of the terms "Motion" and "Resolution"

Code:
G16-D005
Party Unit:
Members of the Party
Proposal Type:
Directive
Resolution Status:
Drafted
Resolution Timing:
In Advance
Submission Date:
Sunday, May 15, 2016

Party Commentary

This is both a change to the Constitution and is a party directive which reverses the common Canadian understanding of the meanings of the words" resolution" and "motion". 

In Canada a resolution is defined as "a main motion that needs to be expressed formally in writing, to attach a special level of importance, such as policy or constitutional amendments."

Preamble

WHEREAS a motion is movement and a resolution is resolved;

WHEREAS motions are moved prior to being resolved;

WHEREAS a motion may be rejected and therefore never resolved;

WHEREAS a resolution is resolved on its adoption;

WHEREAS a motion on submission cannot be a resolution;

Operative

BE IT RESOLVED that wherever in the constitution, in the web site, and in the process and procedures of all our committees, reference is made to a resolution in a context clearly prior to its resolution, that the reference be changed to “motion”;

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that wherever a reference is made to a “motion” in a context clearly following its adoption that the reference be changed to “resolution.”

Sponsors:
Ard van Leeuwen, Burt Folkins, Colin Old, Constantine Kritsonis, Cyrille Giraud, Danny Polifroni, Diana Nunes, Erich Jacoby-Hawkins, Frances Coates, Ian Soutar, Joe Foster, Johan Hamels, Kay Foster, Lorraine Rekmans, Marcus Madsen, Mario Leclerc, Mark MacKenzie, Norbert d'Costa, Saul Bottcher, Sharon Danley, Stacey Leadbetter

Background

According to the CGA publication, “How to Conduct a Meeting,” -- “Though the terms “motion” and “resolution” are frequently used as synonyms, the terms are separate and distinct. A motion is a proposition placed before a meeting for discussion and decision. If, as a result of that discussion, the proposal is carried by a vote of the members, it is considered a resolution of the meeting.”
This is a confusion which exists throughout the deliberations of the Green party. It exists in the way we call our BGMs, in the way we present ideas for discussion, in the way we have organized and presented our web site, and in the way our executive operates. It is not being pedantic to request that this terminology be normalised.

Code

G16-D005

Proposal Type

Directive

Party Commentary

This is both a change to the Constitution and is a party directive which reverses the common Canadian understanding of the meanings of the words" resolution" and "motion". 

In Canada a resolution is defined as "a main motion that needs to be expressed formally in writing, to attach a special level of importance, such as policy or constitutional amendments."

Preamble

WHEREAS a motion is movement and a resolution is resolved;

WHEREAS motions are moved prior to being resolved;

WHEREAS a motion may be rejected and therefore never resolved;

WHEREAS a resolution is resolved on its adoption;

WHEREAS a motion on submission cannot be a resolution;

Operative

BE IT RESOLVED that wherever in the constitution, in the web site, and in the process and procedures of all our committees, reference is made to a resolution in a context clearly prior to its resolution, that the reference be changed to “motion”;

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that wherever a reference is made to a “motion” in a context clearly following its adoption that the reference be changed to “resolution.”

Sponsors

Ard van Leeuwen, Burt Folkins, Colin Old, Constantine Kritsonis, Cyrille Giraud, Danny Polifroni, Diana Nunes, Erich Jacoby-Hawkins, Frances Coates, Ian Soutar, Joe Foster, Johan Hamels, Kay Foster, Lorraine Rekmans, Marcus Madsen, Mario Leclerc, Mark MacKenzie, Norbert d'Costa, Saul Bottcher, Sharon Danley, Stacey Leadbetter

Background

According to the CGA publication, “How to Conduct a Meeting,” -- “Though the terms “motion” and “resolution” are frequently used as synonyms, the terms are separate and distinct. A motion is a proposition placed before a meeting for discussion and decision. If, as a result of that discussion, the proposal is carried by a vote of the members, it is considered a resolution of the meeting.”
This is a confusion which exists throughout the deliberations of the Green party. It exists in the way we call our BGMs, in the way we present ideas for discussion, in the way we have organized and presented our web site, and in the way our executive operates. It is not being pedantic to request that this terminology be normalised.