Replacing the word “Principles” with “Values” in the Constitution

Code:
G16-C013
Party Unit:
Members of the Party
Proposal Type:
Constitutional
Resolution Status:
Adopted, pending ratification
Resolution Timing:
In Advance
Submission Date:
Sunday, May 15, 2016
Submitter Name:
Dimitri Lascalis

Party Commentary

This does not change the constitution but it might create some confusion. Although technically correct, eliminating the word "principles" entirely might break the connection between GPC Values and the Global Green Charter Principles, which are meant to be the same. The Global Green Charter gets around this by including a detailed statement under each Principle heading.

Preamble

WHEREAS Values are the high-level fabric that provides the baseline for a society’s core beliefs on how all human beings are to live together and,
WHEREAS Principles are the first step in identifying the guidelines for action based on those values.

Operative

Be it resolved that in Article 5, all references to the term “Principles” be replaced with the term “Values” and,
that Clause 5.2 be deleted.

Sponsors:
Andy Park, Burt Folkins, Colin Griffiths, Colin Old, Cyrille Giraud, Danny Polifroni, Erich Jacoby-Hawkins, Frances Coates, Ian Soutar, Joe Foster, Johan Hamels, Marcus Madsen, Mario Leclerc, Mark MacKenzie, Sharon Danley, Stacey Leadbetter, Stephan Kliestch, Suzanne Lacourcière

Background

The current Constitution confuses Principles and Values, even though we generally use the term values in our documentation.

Principles are a set of statements that more explicitly define our Values as set out in Article 5. By differentiating between Values and Principles, we can provide a better framework for creating policies and positions. A couple of examples are:
Value: Non-violence
1. Principle: The death penalty is not an appropriate component of our Justice system
2. Solitary confinement is a violation of Human Rights.

With these as guidelines, we can then create policies to reflect these Principles in line with non-violence. For example, we could develop policy (ies) outlining if and when solitary confinement is justified. Approximately half of all prisoners in Canada spend time in solitary confinement. A disproportionate number represent minorities and persons with a mental disability. Some have spent years in what is termed “a cruel and unusual punishment.”

The current Global Greens Charter, referenced in Article 5.4 of the constitution, uses the term principles interchangeably to mean values and principles.

Code

G16-C013

Proposal Type

Constitutional

Submitter Name

Dimitri Lascalis

Party Commentary

This does not change the constitution but it might create some confusion. Although technically correct, eliminating the word "principles" entirely might break the connection between GPC Values and the Global Green Charter Principles, which are meant to be the same. The Global Green Charter gets around this by including a detailed statement under each Principle heading.

Preamble

WHEREAS Values are the high-level fabric that provides the baseline for a society’s core beliefs on how all human beings are to live together and,
WHEREAS Principles are the first step in identifying the guidelines for action based on those values.

Operative

Be it resolved that in Article 5, all references to the term “Principles” be replaced with the term “Values” and,
that Clause 5.2 be deleted.

Sponsors

Andy Park, Burt Folkins, Colin Griffiths, Colin Old, Cyrille Giraud, Danny Polifroni, Erich Jacoby-Hawkins, Frances Coates, Ian Soutar, Joe Foster, Johan Hamels, Marcus Madsen, Mario Leclerc, Mark MacKenzie, Sharon Danley, Stacey Leadbetter, Stephan Kliestch, Suzanne Lacourcière

Background

The current Constitution confuses Principles and Values, even though we generally use the term values in our documentation.

Principles are a set of statements that more explicitly define our Values as set out in Article 5. By differentiating between Values and Principles, we can provide a better framework for creating policies and positions. A couple of examples are:
Value: Non-violence
1. Principle: The death penalty is not an appropriate component of our Justice system
2. Solitary confinement is a violation of Human Rights.

With these as guidelines, we can then create policies to reflect these Principles in line with non-violence. For example, we could develop policy (ies) outlining if and when solitary confinement is justified. Approximately half of all prisoners in Canada spend time in solitary confinement. A disproportionate number represent minorities and persons with a mental disability. Some have spent years in what is termed “a cruel and unusual punishment.”

The current Global Greens Charter, referenced in Article 5.4 of the constitution, uses the term principles interchangeably to mean values and principles.