Democracy

A Democracy Theme Park?

“I recall the words of the late journalist, a great Canadian, James Travers.  We were both on CBC Sunday Edition in the spring of 2009, discussing the thre

Critics want prime minister Stephen Harper ousted

Publication Source: 
Georgia Straight
Author: 
Charlie Smith

Two of the leaders in raising Canadians’ awareness about climate change say the time has come for Conservatives to replace Stephen Harper as leader. In separate phone interviews with the Georgia Straight, Green Party of Canada Leader Elizabeth May and Andrew Weaver, a Canada Research Chair in climate modelling and analysis at the University of Victoria, said they each know many Conservatives who agree with the scientific consensus that human activity is increasing the planet’s average temperature. But both claimed that Harper’s intransigence on this issue is preventing Canada from taking any positive action.

When asked if the federal government’s position could change under a new Conservative leader, May replied: “Absolutely.”

“In the current Conservative caucus, I would suggest the majority understand and support climate science,” she added.

View the full original article >>

Points of Order - Bill C-38

[Context: This is in response to Elizabeth’s Point of Order of June 4th.]

May: Budget bill an outrage

Publication Source: 
May: Budget bill an outrage
Author: 
Paul McLeod

The fate of this year’s and all future omnibus budget bills will be placed in the hands of the Speaker of the House of Commons.

Elizabeth May, leader of the Green party, rose Monday in the House on a point of order to argue that the Conservatives’ budget bill is so broad, it breaks parliamentary rules.

She asked Speaker Andrew Scheer to rule the bill out of order, thus sending it back to the government to be chopped into smaller pieces.

View the full original article >>

Points of Order – Bill C-38

Elizabeth May: Mr. Speaker, I am rising on a point of order today.

May looks to put procedural roadblock in budget bill’s path

Publication Source: 
iPolitics.ca
Author: 
James Munson

Green party leader Elizabeth May issued a point of order in the House of Commons Monday afternoon arguing the contentious omnibus budget bill should be withdrawn.

Her 16-page argument asks Speaker Andrew Scheer to decide whether Bill C-38 was introduced to parliamentarians in an "imperfect shape," or, in other words, that is not a legitimate omnibus bill as determined by legislative rules.

Using former Speaker rulings, statements from academics and media reports, May's point of order outlines the definition of a "proper" omnibus bill.

View the full original article >>

C-38: The procedural battle

Publication Source: 
Macleans
Author: 
Aaron Wherry

As suggested last week, Elizabeth May, the Liberals and the Bloc MPs are apparently preparing to move approximately 200 amendments to the budget bill when it returns to the House—creating a series of votes that should take 50 to 60 hours to complete.

“There’s nothing I won’t do to stop it,” she told The Hill Times …“If you respect Westminster Parliamentary democracy, you approach bills according to a theme that is coherent and has integrity; one idea at a time. Even an omnibus bill is, under our rules, one theme, one principle, one policy area at a time. This is not appropriate. This is an abuse of power,” she said. “And what tools does a responsible opposition have to protect the country? I’ll use every tool that’s legal and within the Parliamentary toolkit. I have to use every tool we have and the Liberals are of the same mind.”

Nathan Cullen said last week that the NDP will have its own changes to propose at third reading, likely adding to the votes. The hope, according to Ms. May, is to convince the government side to split the bill.

View the full original article >>

May determined to thwart Bill C-38

Publication Source: 
The StarPhoenix
Author: 
David Hutton

Green Party Leader Elizabeth May said she will make every attempt to thwart the sweeping overhaul of Canadian law laid out in the omnibus budget bill in the coming week.

"This is a fight to ensure Canadians live in a democracy," she told a packed conference hall at the Federation of Canadian Municipalities conference in Saskatoon.

May and the Liberals plan on a test of parliamentary endurance to delay the passage of the 425-page Bill C-38, which would overhaul environmental protection and fisheries laws, streamline reviews for major natural resource projects, make it more difficult for Canadians receiving EI to refuse work and earmark funds for the Canada Revenue Agency to scrutinize the political activities of charities, among dozens of other changes.

View the full original article >>

Grits, Green to table 200 amendments on feds’ omnibus budget bill, expect 60 hours of House roll call votes

Publication Source: 
Hill Times
Author: 
Bea Vongdouangchanh

Calling the federal government's massive omnibus Budget Implementation Bill "an abuse of power," the Liberals and Green Party have joined forces and plan to table more than 200 amendments when the bill is returned from the Finance Committee to the Commons Chamber floor at report stage, possibly as early as this week, setting off between 50 to 60 consecutive hours of roll call House voting in which MPs must stay in their seats around the clock or risk losing votes.

Green Party Leader Elizabeth May (Saanich-Gulf Islands, B.C.) will be moving the majority of those amendments relating to environmental provisions found in Bill C-38, the Budget Implementation Bill. As she is the only Green MP in the House and her party is not recognized as an official party, Ms. May cannot sit on committees, but is allowed to introduce substantive amendments when bills return to the House at report stage.

Liberal House Leader Marc Garneau (Westmount-Ville Marie, Que.) told The Hill Times last week that it takes approximately one hour to move four roll call votes through the House.

View the full original article >>

How to make passing a bill as difficult as possible

Publication Source: 
Macleans
Author: 
Aaron Wherry

Elizabeth May explains what the support of the Liberals means for her efforts to amend the budget.

Because the Greens do not have official party status in the House of Commons, Ms. May is not given a seat on parliamentary committees. As a tradeoff, she is permitted to propose an unlimited number of amendments to bills that have come back to the House from committees. All she needs is the support of five other MPs. And the Liberals have agreed to do that in the case of the budget bill.

“The aim is to create such a substantial logjam that the government will have to negotiate removing the environmental and other non-budgetary matters from Bill C-38,” Ms. May said Monday. Each vote on an amendment takes 15 minutes, there could be hundreds of amendments, so “you do the math,” she said.

View the full original article >>
Syndicate content